INSIDE THE OILERS
POSTED ON Wednesday, 04.6.2016 / 2:10 PM MT
By Kelli Gustafson - edmontonoilers.com / Inside the Oilers

“It’s a really good day to be the Mayor of Edmonton,” Don Iveson beamed, as he addressed the crowd at Churchill Square earlier this afternoon.

Nearly 100 Oilers alumni joined the Farewell Rexall Place celebrations beginning at City Hall, where they were recognized and applauded by thousands of cheering fans.

The pavement of Churchill Square could barely be recognized, as fans flooded the area in orange, blue, and white, with the hopes to catch a glimpse of some of their hockey heroes.

“It felt almost like a Stanley Cup parade,” Georges Laraque commented on the excitement, “This shows why we have the best fans in the world.”

Mark Messier agreed, “This looks familiar to 1984.”

“I remember coming to city hall and having the big gathering here, and thanking the fans, and here we are again in another big crowd — wow, what a powerful day today for so many people in the organization, in the city, and obviously the players.”

Ryan Smyth also addressed the crowd after receiving an extensive applause.

“It’s a bittersweet day… there’s a lot of memories, a lot of history in that building. But, in the same breath, there’s another one just a few blocks around the corner here, that many new memories are going to be made in.”

“Thank you to the fans, the media and the City of Edmonton.”

|
|
|
POSTED ON Wednesday, 04.6.2016 / 1:39 PM MT
By Meg Tilley - edmontonoilers.com / Inside the Oilers

It seems as though the Oilers alumni continue to echo one another’s sentiments.

“Good, sad, happy — all the emotions that will be coming tonight for everybody a lot of people that put the uniform on, a lot of people that work for the team, a lot of fans that have been here from day one when it first opened, it will be quite an evening,” said Oilers alumnus Mark Messier.

One of 160+ alumni in attendance today, Messier was in awe of the number in attendance and how the building itself has made its mark in the heart of Oil Country.

“It’s amazing how a building can take on a life of it’s own,” he said. “All the great moments that were played here, one after another, I’ve seen my first concert here — Fleetwood Mac — back in the early ’70’s. Think about all the different — not only the hockey games — but all the other emotions and events that [have] happened here too. It’s going to be a powerful night for the city of Edmonton.”

A sold-out arena will see the Oilers host the Vancouver Canucks for the very last time at Rexall Place, as they close out the night with a final farewell ceremony that will feel like a blast from the past.

“I never thought — like many people — that the NHL would come to Edmonton,” said Messier. “And as a hockey player growing up, I never thought that I would ever have a chance to play in my hometown in the NHL. Both those things happened, and of course, being able to win and [be] part of the team that’s won five Stanley Cups in my hometown, it doesn’t get much better than that. So for me personally, it’s been a long journey seeing this rink built in the early ’70’s and all the moments in-between.”

|
|
|
POSTED ON Wednesday, 04.6.2016 / 1:14 PM MT
By Meg Tilley - edmontonoilers.com / Inside the Oilers

“It will be emotional tonight,” said Oilers alumnus Jari Kurri, looking around and taking in his fellow alumni that surround him.

As Oil Country prepares to say their final farewell to the building that’s housed the Oilers since 1974, Kurri is right, it will be a very emotional night.

“A lot of good memories. There were a lot of records being made in this building, but the first that always comes to my mind is that first Stanley Cup and not knowing what’s going to happen and how everybody reacted — the players, the fans, the city,” said Kurri.

Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2001, the Finnish winger spent 10 seasons with the Oilers, winning five Stanley Cups with the team.

“Coming from Europe, I had no clue how much it meant with winning,” he admits. “I was shocked. People were hugging each other who they didn’t even know who they were. People were driving through the city in the cars and people were all over the place celebrating on the roof and everywhere. It was so much fun.”

As the Oilers host the Vancouver Canucks for their final game at Rexall Place, Kurri said it’s sad to leave it all behind but he looks forward to the Oilers future at Rogers Place.

“Life goes on and everybody is looking forward to the next new building. It’s going to be unbelievable.”

|
|
|
POSTED ON Wednesday, 04.6.2016 / 12:51 PM MT
By Meg Tilley - edmontonoilers.com / Inside the Oilers

Long before the Oilers made Northlands Coliseum their home, and even prior to their NHL merge in 1979, they called Edmonton Gardens their home and were playing in the World Hockey Association.

It was there that Oilers alumnus Wayne Zuk remembers a specific moment between he and teammate Val Fonteyne.

“[Val] was 38 years old and I was 23 years old and we’re playing on the same team and I’ll never forget, Brian Shaw was our coach at the time, and prior to the warmup he says ‘Val, you’re going to shadow Bobby Hull tonight, and Wayne, you’re going to shadow Bobby Hull tonight,’” he said.

“We couldn’t figure out why it would take two of us to shadow Hull. And the answer to that question was, well, that’s because we could only stay on the ice for about a minute maximum and Hull stayed on three, four minutes as a shift. We figured out later we needed two guys to shadow him.”

It’s one of many memories Zuk says he’ll never forget and is grateful for the opportunity to be present for Oil Country’s final farewell to Rexall Place.

“The Oilers have gone above and beyond, I think, in hosting this event,” he said. “Even reaching back to guys who are older, who’ve never played in the NHL and were WHA guys — the fact that they would invite us and have us be a part of this event, speaks to how classy they are.”

|
|
|
POSTED ON Tuesday, 04.5.2016 / 3:20 PM MT
|
|
|
POSTED ON Tuesday, 04.5.2016 / 3:09 PM MT
By Kelli Gustafson - edmontonoilers.com / Inside the Oilers

With only 24 hours to go before the Farewell Rexall Place festivities commence, some notable Oilers alumni met at The Westin early Tuesday afternoon.

“It’s always nice to be back here,” Jari Kurri commented on returning to Edmonton.

With his banner hanging from the Rexall Place rafters, Kurri will be one of many notable Oilers alumni returning to the arena tomorrow, to bid farewell to this historic building.

Winning five Stanley Cups with the Edmonton Oilers, Kurri recalls many fond memories inside Rexall Place.

When asked what one of his favourite memories was from playing, Kurri smiled, “[Winning] the first Stanley Cup always comes to mind.” He later added, “[Wayne] Gretzky’s 50 goals in 39 games — nobody believed that could happen!”

Kurri also spoke on Rogers Place, saying, “What a place! It is going to be an amazing building [that] the fans will enjoy and the players will enjoy!”

“Maybe they can have a fresh start and build their own history in that building”

|
|
|
POSTED ON Tuesday, 04.5.2016 / 2:59 PM MT
By Kelli Gustafson - edmontonoilers.com / Inside the Oilers

Alongside Jari Kurri and Grant Fuhr, Jussi Markkanen was asked by the media to recall some of his favourite memories inside Rexall Place.

Instantly, Markkanen jumped to Game 6 of the 2006 Stanley Cup Playoffs against the Carolina Hurricanes.

“The fans are yelling… you get goose bumps talking about it!” Markkanen said. “Not just the building, [but] the whole city was behind us. Felt like the whole city was inside that building. You couldn’t hear your own voice on the ice!”

With idols like Kurri, coming from Finland, Markkanen added, “It was a dream come true to come and play in Rexall.”

Looking at the current team, Markkanen is excited to watch the Oilers move into Rogers Place.

“There’s a lot of young talent on the team right now.”

|
|
|
POSTED ON Tuesday, 04.5.2016 / 2:58 PM MT
By Kelli Gustafson - edmontonoilers.com / Inside the Oilers

Alongside Jari Kurri’s banner, hangs another Oilers legend — Grant Fuhr.

Fuhr, selected eighth overall in the 1981 NHL Draft by Edmonton, went on to win four Stanley Cups with the Oilers.

“A lot of great memories in the old building,” Fuhr told the media, while reminiscing on the playoff series games.

Fuhr fondly recalls the excitement that was shared between the team and the fans, “Being a small-market team, you’re closer to your fans than you would be in a big city.”

When asked what helped the team perform so well during those years, Fuhr said, “The biggest thing we had was a family atmosphere… they are great friendships that have lasted forever.

“The guys liked spending time together, I think that’s what made us such a good team.”

The move from Rexall Place to Rogers Place will be the second move that Fuhr sees, remembering the move from Edmonton Gardens to Northlands Coliseum in 1974.

|
|
|
POSTED ON Tuesday, 04.5.2016 / 11:21 AM MT
By Chris Wescott - edmontonoilers.com / Inside the Oilers

The Oilers are on the ice for their final practice at Rexall Place.

There aren't any changes to the participants.

Lines:

Maroon-McDavid-Draisaitl
Hall-RNH-Eberle
Korpikoski-Letestu-Yakupov
Hendricks-Pakarinen-Kassian
Gazdic-Lander-Cracknell

Stay tuned for full coverage and interviews from the players and coach Todd McLellan.

|
|
|
POSTED ON Monday, 04.4.2016 / 3:30 PM MT
By Chris Wescott - edmontonoilers.com / Inside the Oilers



The Oilers will host the Vancouver Canucks on April 6 for their final home game in Rexall Place, before moving downtown to Rogers Place in the fall. The post-game farewell ceremony will host more than 100 Oilers alumni in attendance. Each day leading up to that game we are announcing five alumni who are scheduled to attend. Here are today’s five, and this group contains a huge star.

Wayne Gretzky is someone who needs no introduction, but here are some notes on the man they call “The Great One.” Gretzky became the most dominant player in the history of the sport, setting records and displaying skill and talent unlike anything the league has seen. He won the Hart Trophy his first year in the NHL, becoming the first player to do so. He won seven straight scoring titles beginning with the 1980 season. In addition to helping Edmonton win its first four Cups, Gretzky took home an astounding number of awards in his NHL career, including 10 Art Ross trophies, two Conn Smythe trophies, nine Hart Memorial trophies, five Lady Byngs, and numerous All-Star nods. Gretzky played 1487 career NHL games, and 208 in the post-season. Number 99 still holds many NHL records, including most goals in his career (894). He was immediately inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame following his retirement in 1999.

Joey Moss is one of the most well-known and beloved figures in the Oilers organization and in the Edmonton community. Moss, born with Down Syndrome, has worked with the team as a dressing room assistant since the 1984-85 season. He has been with the Oilers for four of their five Stanley Cup championship seasons. He helps clean the dressing room, assists with laundry and handles the towels and water for games and practices, also helping with the distribution of equipment. He is active in the community, including his support of a fashion show supporting the Edmonton Down Syndrome Society and “Joey’s Home” which is an assisted-living home for individuals with developmental disabilities.

Garry Unger ranks second on the list of consecutive games played in NHL history. His iron-man streak lasted 914 games. The Calgary, AB native played parts of three seasons for the Oilers between the 1980-81 and 1982-83 seasons. Unger finished a lengthy and successful NHL career having played 1105 regular season games, scoring 413 goals and recording a total of 804 points. Unger also played in 51 playoff games in his NHL career.

Kirk Maltbywas drafted by the Oilers in the third round, 65th overall, of the 1992 NHL Draft. Although he’d begin his professional career with the Oilers organization, he’s best known for his long run with the Detroit Red Wings. He played over 1000 NHL games in his career, including 164 games for Edmonton, scoring 21 goals and 17 assists.

Jussi Markkanen was a fifth-round pick of the Oilers in 2001. The Finnish goalie played 100-plus games for the Oil, most notably during the 2006 Stanley Cup Final. Following a knee injury to Dwayne Roloson in Game 1 of the Final series vs. Carolina, Markkanen was thrust into action starting in Game 2. Backstopped by Markkanen, the Oilers came just one win shy of capturing their sixth Stanley Cup.

|
|
|
INSIDE THE OILERS BLOG